The Newton Press-Mentor got to enjoy some unique visitors last week. They were Tobi (female), 9 weeks, and Roscoe P. Coltrane, 2 years old. They are Java Mcaque primates, who stopped by with their owner, Shirley and Jerry Novak of Noble, to talk about how the primates can be used to help people with disabilities and S.A.R.A. Tobi and Roscoe are American born. No animals are brought to the U.S. from a foreign country.



S.A.R.A. (Service Animals Registry of America) promotes the use of service animals by the disabled. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a service animal as any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. The term is used in 36.302(c), which required public accommodations generally to modify policies, practices, and procedures to accommodate the use of service animals in places or public accommodation.


The Newton Press-Mentor got to enjoy some unique visitors last week. They were Tobi (female), 9 weeks, and Roscoe P. Coltrane, 2 years old. They are Java Mcaque primates, who stopped by with their owner, Shirley and Jerry Novak of Noble, to talk about how the primates can be used to help people with disabilities and S.A.R.A. Tobi and Roscoe are American born. No animals are brought to the U.S. from a foreign country.

S.A.R.A. (Service Animals Registry of America) promotes the use of service animals by the disabled. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a service animal as any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. The term is used in 36.302(c), which required public accommodations generally to modify policies, practices, and procedures to accommodate the use of service animals in places or public accommodation.

Service animals perform some of the functions and tasks that individuals with a disability cannot perform for themselves. Usually, when one thinks of a service animal, they think of a seeing eye dog, but there are other animals used for the same purpose. The most common are dogs, cats, primates and birds. Any animal that can be trained can be a service animal. The training, however, does need to be performed by a professional trainer.

Service animals can not only help the blind, they can alert persons with hearing impairments to sounds, such as a telephone or a knock at the door. They can also pull wheelchairs and carry or pick up things for the person with mobility impairments. Service animals have also been trained to alert persons before they have seizures.

Once an animal is registered with S.A.R.A. the owner will receive a SARA ID card that identifies the service animal and its SARA number. And, although, the ADA does not require any special equipment or attire for a service animal some states do. The most commonly used equipment is a collar, leash, harness, backpack, neck scarf (bandana), cape, vest, jacket or T-shirt. The attire will usually have an identifying patch alerting the public that it is a service animal. The color red is most often used and is universally recognized as the service animal color.

For those interested in more information on S.A.R.A., contact them at P.O. Box 607, Midlothian, TX 76065 or 206-376-8931; www.affluent.net.