These Brooklyn transplants put together a mish-mash of early 80s Madonna-tinged arrangements. Listen to “Planet Health” – too happy dance pop – and check the bouncy iTunes Nano commercial anthem “Bruises.”

Let’s keep this short and sweet: new music, new bands and more fun than getting a sugar rush from a mouthful of Swedish Fish.

Chairlift – "Does You Inspire You" (Kanine/Columbia)

These Brooklyn transplants put together a mish-mash of early '80s Madonna-tinged arrangements. Listen to “Planet Health” – too happy dance pop – and check the bouncy iTunes Nano commercial anthem “Bruises.” But the mysteriously psychedelic Grizzly Bear-produced “Dixie Gypsy” just doesn’t fit. "Inspire" definitely has a true dream pop identity, and singer Caroline Polachek’s alluring vocals makes it super attractive. Hopefully this won’t get lost in the recent rush of throwback '80s synth pop, half of which is rubbish.

Rating: 7.8 out of 10 Fever Ray – "Fever Ray" (Mute/Rabid Records)

Karin Elisabeth Dreijer Andersson, vocalist for The Knife and contributing singer on Röyksopp’s new album, is, at least for the time being, Fever Ray. It really doesn’t matter what Andersson calls herself, she turns everything into pure bliss. The Swede’s self-titled album wows with an infectious swirl of electronic pop, electrified by Andersson’s sexy, dark and slithering vocals. Top tracks: “Triangle Walks” and “When I Grow Up.”

Rating: 9.6 out of 10 88-Keys – "The Death of Adam" (Decon Records)   First off, "The Death of Adam" is a concept album (I think) about the death of a man named Adam (perceived to be producer and lyricist 88-Keys). Here’s another album that’s all over the place. Against the best hip-hop concept albums of all time, Mr. Lif’s epic "I Phantom," this one falls short. The production is tight on this album, and the cameos of Kanye, Redman, Kid Cudi and Little Brother’s Phonte, keep this afloat. Phonte and 88-Keys’ collaboration on “Close Call,” and the overall production, holds this album together. But the lyrics do it little justice. Rating: 6.8 out of 10   BM Linx – "Black Entertainment" (Craze Factory)

It’s about time NYC put its foot down and gave (as strange as it sounds) a friendly middle finger to the UK, which took over the universe last year with ace indie rock, punk, and synth-pop bands. The burgeoning early 2000s’ indie scene of The Strokes, Interpol, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, etc., became somewhat forgotten after the onslaught of absolutely phenomenal UK bands. The BM Linx boys have managed to spin progressive, industrial, new wave and electronic rock genres into a sound that’ll excite and rattle everyone from the East Village in Manhattan to the England’s epic venues. If you don’t believe me (even though you should), listen to “Kids on Fire” and then “Find the Water,” which fall on opposite ends of this splendid spectrum.

Rating: 8.7 out of 10  

Ryan Wood is a freelance writer who has contributed to the Community Newspaper Company, Noize Makes Enemies, The Sun (London), The Sunday Sun (Northeast England), The Weekly Dig, and The Noise. Send him an e-mail at rwood76@gmail.com. For more, including reviews of some of the hottest new music from Ladyhawke and Say Hi, check out his blog, Take Me to Your Music, at http://blogs.townonline.com/planetmusic. You can also read more in the Take Me to Your Music Facebook group.